Thursday, April 24, 2014

Spring Wildflower Pilgrimage 2014 Day 4

DSC_0154Last week we attended the Spring Wildflower Pilgrimage 2014. Here are my notes from Day 4.
 
I decided that instead of writing a list of all the plants we saw, I would put them in a spreadsheet and then write the location and notes beside them. This would help me see the big picture instead just a list of a plants and things. You can download the spreadsheet HERE.

Here is the link to Day 4 Pictures HERE.

On Day 4, we began our day with a photography class with Jack Carman and Robert Hutson. We attended this last year and it was so wonderful that we wanted to come back again. In the afternoon we took a Fern Walk with Keith Bowman and saw a ton of ferns!

Things I learned:
1. Landscape – f/22, maximum depth of focus (DOF)
2. Need foreground, mid ground, and background to be interesting.
3. Center of interest needs to be sharp in focus.
4. Fast shutter = 1/500 shutter speed.
5. 1/25 stops motion of water
6. Normal camera settings read as 18% gray. Open up a stop or two so snow appears white.
7. Rules of thirds - put center of interest on intersection
8. Sunrise and sunset – use manual setting; take reading without the sun, then note settings. Turn on manual and set camera to those settings.
9. Be at sunrise 30 minutes before for maximum color conditions.
10. Spider web and dew drops – minimum DOF so no distractions in background.
11. Eyes drawn to white spot on image.
12. Mushrooms – ensure light is on the stems or they look like they are floating on air
13. Put sun at your ack.
14. Wide angle – if aimed slightly upward, causes keystoining
15. Get on level with the flower
16. Individual flowers – at an angle produces more depth
17. Competing centers of interest is hard to look at.
18. Have odd numbers of flowers; small or large groups.
19. With large groups, leave some dead space.
20. Diffused light – use white umbrella
21. Use tripod for stability and DOF
22. Use stick and clothespin for holding something in the wind.
23. Ebony spleenwort has a dark shiny rachis
24. Rattlesnake fern is triangular in structure and dies back in the winter.
25. Grape fern is leathery and evergreen.
26. Rock cap looks like Christmas fern but attacked all over.
27. Walking fern looks like it walks because the tip grows roots and forms a new plant.
28. Hayscented Fern – hairy all over leaves, pinna looks like little steps perpendicular to the rib.
29. Daisy Leaf Moonwart looks like a runty rattlesnake fern.
30. Silvery Glad fern form in clumps and have square pinnules.

Original Photo by Pat Hensley

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Spring Wildflower Pilgrimage 2014 Day 3

Last week we attended the Spring Wildflower Pilgrimage 2014. Here are my notes from Day 3.

I decided that instead of writing a list of all the plants we saw, I would put them in a spreadsheet and then write the location and notes beside them. This would help me see the big picture instead just a list of a plants and things. You can download the spreadsheet HERE.

Here is the link to Day 3 Pictures HERE.

DSC_0044On Day 3 (4/18/14), we began the day with Forest Foods and Pharmacy led by Ila Hatter, Wanda DeWaard, and Brittney Hughes. This is the second year we attended this and it was awesome! I learn so much with this group and they are full of such useful and interesting information. In the afternoon we went on a moss walk led by Keith Bowman who did a great job and was very knowledgeable. I just don’t think I’m ready to go into depth about mosses. I did learn some interesting information about mosses that I would not have known if I hadn’t been on this walk. In the evening we went on a Bat Walk and it was interesting too. Unfortunately the scientists leading it was unable to catch a bat in their net.
In the afternoon we went on the West Prong Trail with leaders: Jeremy Lloyd from Tremont and Chris Fleming from Nashville (along with his wife Sunny). We ended up splitting into two groups and we were with Chris who had a plethora of knowledge about what we were looking at!

Things I learned:
1. Uganes are the fresh, first growth of mixed greens.
2. Cut unfurled Solomon’s seal – parboil and saute in butter.
3. Little blooms called Solomon’s concubines.
4. Stonecrop sedum are edible but not choice; full of water content
5. Sassafras – root for tea; leaves to thicken, when using stem – boil about 15 minutes; steep leave for tea; is a blood thinner, full of iron and antioxidents. Good to “get rid of the mountain punies.”
6. Gray headed coneflower (rudebeckia) - gather 1-1 ½ feet high in spring. Aka Sochan or sochani. Parboil and toss out first water. Then sautee in skillet with fatback; likes wet places, easy to grow and transplant.
7. Longspur violets full of vitamin C. Steep in tea. Can nibble on flowers full of nectar. All violets are edible. European violets have an aroma. If no aroma, no flavor. Good for hematomas. 50 blossoms equal one rutin tablet. (rutin good for capillary health). Rutin needs vitamin C. More vitamin C than an orange.
8. Mullein – leaves for tea (simmer and breathe in steam for congestion), dip stalk in tallow and make a primitive light; yellow flowers in olive oil for 6 weeks for ear drops to help ear aches; bronchodilator so good for asthma, you can drink the tea. Doctrine of signatures – hair on it matches cilia in the lungs; wash and dry it; also used as insulation in moccasins; band aids, toilet paper,
9. Buffalo nut – not edible or medicinal; oil could be used as light; parasitic plant.
10. Dandelion – closes up when rain is coming; good diuretic for time when people preserved meat with salt; more in leaves than flower; gets bitter as they get older but if you use it with a tomato base, it takes care of the bitterness; blossoms have lecithin for fat metabolism; an emulsifier; lecithin lowers triglycerides but won’t work on cholesterol, used in jellies and muffins; more Vitamin A than carrots; domesticated in Italy and France; root makes a coffee; great for urinary tract, liver, or kidney problems; naturally sweet; stem sap can remove warts; make a tincture (fill glass jar with lightly packed leaves, add 100% vodka, label and put in a dark place for 6 weeks. Use 15 drops in water or on the tongue)
11. Roadside Rambles Cookbook has recipes and a USDA list.
12. Rattlesnake Plantain – doesn’t work for snake bite
13. Yucca – flowers in vinegar; used to keep animals out of the yard or as a needle and thread.
14. Partridge berry – roots as a tea for labor, childbirth, or menopause; berries are tasteless but not toxic.
15. Ground cedar – antiseptic; used on baby’s butts for diaper rash
16. Devil’s Walking stick – young shoots can be boiled and eaten
17. Tulip Poplar – make salve or liniment for burns; blossoms full of nectar and taste sweet
18. Mint – antiseptic tea, expectorant, sweeten with a little honey.
19. Medicine tastes bad to get rid of the bad entity inside of you.
20. Galax – illegally harvested to be used as canapĂ© trays.
21. Greenbriar – tender leaves are tasty to eat on the trail; jello in the woods; roots can be boiled or dried and used to thicken broth
22. Wild Strawberries – flavor is strong but fruit is small.
23. Black birch – leaf buds growing off 90 degree angle; commercial source for wintergreen; break and boil in water; used as a low dose of analgesic
24. Wintergreen (teaberry) – boil leave in water; analgesic also, smell before chewing to make sure it isn’t mountain laurel
25. Dogwood – inner bark used for redicing fevers and pain; strong wood used for shuttles in weaving looms, hiking sticks, wedges for splitting wood, axes
26. Sweetgum – find green balls which contain low dose of Tamiflu; smash open with hammer so it opens a little. Put in jar with vodka and make a tincture (15 drops in water and drink like Tamiflu twice a day); Doctrine of Signatures – virus looks like a sweetgum ball.
27. Wood sorrel – used for hemorrhoids; roots are an astringent, make tea and apply on hemorrhoids, after dental surgery, antiseptic
28. Mosses are J shaped on side of trees to slow water down and harvest nutrients.
29. There are 5200 mammal species in the world and 21% of them (1200 species) are bats. 16 species of bats in TNN
30. Bats are beneficial for seed dispersal; pollination of products humans use; and pesticide.

Original Photo by Pat Hensley

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Spring Wildflower Pilgrimage 2014 Day 2

DSC_0100Last week we attended the Spring Wildflower Pilgrimage 2014. Here are my notes from Day 2.

I decided that instead of writing a list of all the plants we saw, I would put them in a spreadsheet and then write the location and notes beside them. This would help me see the big picture instead just a list of a plants and things. You can download the spreadsheet HERE.

Here is the link to Day 2 Pictures HERE.

On Day 2 (4/17/14), we started the day out at Noah “Bud” Ogle’s Place. We had four leaders: Jim Pringle from Canada, Ed Bostick from Georgia, Emily Gillespie from Asheville, and Pum Gribbs from Thailand. We ended up splitting up in groups and we ended up with Ed.

In the afternoon we went on the West Prong Trail with leaders: Jeremy Lloyd from Tremont and Chris Fleming from Nashville (along with his wife Sunny). We ended up splitting into two groups and we were with Chris who had a plethora of knowledge about what we were looking at!

Things I learned:
1. Dogwood flower is not a flower. The flower is the cluster in the middle.
2. People used to pickle toothwort and use it as a condiment.
3. Hellebore looks like Lady Slipper or ramps and is very poisonous.
4. Yellow trillium smells lemony.
5. Buffalo nut is poisonous. Parasite at the base of oak trees.
6. Tulip poplar wood was used to make houses. Wood would swell in water.
7. Jack in the pulpit can change sexes.
8. Sicklepod is in the mustard family.
9. Brook lettuce is very edible.
10. Monarch butterflies lay eggs in spice bush.
11. Spruce and Fir trees supported each other.
12. Song of the cardinal – “whatcheer”
13. Partridge berry has 2 dimples where the two flowers fused. Looks like a doll face. Leaves in tea were used by women in childbirth.
14. Birch has horizontal lines.
15. Trout lily takes seven years to bloom.
16. Bishop’s cap is usually near foamflower.
17. All mustards have 4 petals in the shape of a cross.
18. Giant chickweed – sepals only go halfway up. Tennessee Chickweed – sepals are as long as the petals.

Original Photo by Pat Hensley

Monday, April 21, 2014

Spring Wildflower Pilgrimage 2014 Day 1

DSC_0141We attended the Spring Wildflower Pilgrimage in Gatlinburg, TN last week. When we arrived on Tuesday, we had to drive through sleet and snow. We stayed at the Microtel across from the Convention Center. Our room had a small refrigerator, flat screen TV but it smelled terrible! We did go that evening to pick up our registration packet, vote on the photographs in the photo contest, and I bought an event t-shirt.

I decided that instead of writing a list of all the plants we saw, I would put them in a spreadsheet and then write the location and notes beside them. This would help me see the big picture instead just a list of a plants and things. You can download the spreadsheet HERE.

You can see my Day 1 Pictures HERE.

On Day 1 (4/16/14) we started the morning on the Porters Creek Hike which started at the end of Greenbriar Rd. I forgot to get the leaders names but they were really good.

Our afternoon hike was led by Leon Bates (from Chattanooga) and Paul Threadgill (from Maryville College).

Things I learned:
1. Violets can be stemmed or unstemmed.
2. All cemetery headstones in the park face east.
3. Formulas to remember sepals, petals, stamens, ovaries concerning s: Mustard (4, 4,6,2), Buttercup (5,5, many, many), Chickweed (5,5,10,3)
4. Basswood is an indicator species.
5. Cranefly orchid has a purple underside.
6. Yellow birch has a flaky bark.
7. Trillium grandiflorum has a yellow ovary.
8. Partridge berry – the two dimples are from the 2 flowers fused together to form the fruit.
9. Rattlesnake fern or grape fern has vascular cambium; Ray Hicks (storyteller) used to tell people it was a ‘seng pointer fern’ because it pointed to ginseng; Cherokee legend has it that if you had a dream that you were bitten by a rattlesnake, you could use this as medicine.
10. The Buckhorn Inn was a really nice place. We had a wonderful dinner with friends! (Dinner was $35 per person)

Original Photo by Pat Hensley

Friday, April 18, 2014

Useful Information In and Out of the Classroom 4/18/14

tools1 Here are some interesting sites that I’ve found this week, thanks to my PLN. As a teacher, I feel we have to keep up to date concerning research in our field and current issues in the education system. I hope some of these inspire you, inform you, and even have you asking questions. Thank you for coming by and visiting!

Note: Each resource is labeled with a level and subject area to make it easier to use.

Levels: E: Elementary; M: Middle; H: High; G: General, all levels; SN: Special Needs; T: Teachers

Subject Areas: LA: Language Arts, English, Reading, Writing; M: Math; S: Science; Health; SS: Social Studies, Current Events; FA: Fine Arts; Music, Art, Drama; FL: Foreign Language; PE: Physical Ed; C: Career; A: All

Yellowstone Volcano Observatory - gives data about volcanic activity in Yellowstone National Park. (L:G; SA:S)

Little Bird Tales – “Little Bird Tales was created to help nurture children's creativity and imagination while simultaneously creating one of-a-kind digital stories that can easily be shared. We strive to foster a love for reading, writing, self-expression and creative technology and to make the process easy and fun for students and teachers.” (L:E; SA:LA)

Active Science – “High quality interactive materials cover many science topics in the primary and secondary school curriculum. At secondary level they focus on biology topics linked to treatment of disease.” (L:G; SA:S)

Comics in Education – “devoted to examining the use of visual narrative in the K-12 classroom and beyond. Although schools have seen a rise in the use of graphic novels in recent years, this use is often limited to supporting reluctant or developing readers. The focus of Comics in Education is on showing that understanding, decoding, and making meaning of visual narrative has never been more important than it is today for learners of all ages and abilities.” (L:G; SA:LA)

Art Babble – “showcases high quality art-related video content from more than 50 cultural institutions from around the world. ArtBabble is an energetic place to learn for everybody who loves and has an interest in art and particularly for educators who can use it as a way to support their classroom activities.  ArtBabble brings art content from different places and perspectives together, easily accessed and found.  Created in 2009, the website was conceived, designed, programmed, and launched by a cross-departmental collection of individuals at the Indianapolis Museum of Art.” (L:G; SA:S)

Original Image: Tools by Pat Hensley